What Will a Trump Presidency Mean for Education?

New President-elect Donald Trump hasn’t spoken in much detail about his plans for education. The Washington Post recently published an article explaining the education-related policies Trump is likely to put in place.

 “Republican President-elect Donald Trump spoke about education only in broad terms on the campaign trail, leaving plenty of uncertainty about how his administration now intends to handle policy questions ranging from standardized testing and school accountability to the treatment of transgender students.” – Washington Post’s Emma Brown

“Republican President-elect Donald Trump spoke about education only in broad terms on the campaign trail, leaving plenty of uncertainty about how his administration now intends to handle policy questions ranging from standardized testing and school accountability to the treatment of transgender students.” – Washington Post’s Emma Brown

During his campaign, Trump proposed a $20 billion grant program encouraging states to expand school choice, through means such as vouchers, charter schools (read our previous post on charter schools here), and magnet schools. Supporters of the plan believe it will give parents more control over their children’s education. Detractors say it would decimate public education and point out the defeat of similar ballot initiatives in some states.

Outside of this proposal, The Washington Post expects Trump’s policies to have a clear contrast with key Obama policies. Among other initiatives, the article suggests that during the Trump administration, the Education Department will be diminished or eliminated altogether, giving authority over schools to the states instead. However, questions regarding Trump’s plans for education aren’t expected to be settled quickly – due to the amount of time it takes to transition and staff up a new administration, we could be waiting a while.

Regardless of who is in office, we at Elevate Teachers always hope to see teachers supported. Educators deserve our respect and admiration, and we hope that any new education policies will reflect that.

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