Do Teacher Residencies Work?

Chalkbeat recently published an article discussing the trend of teacher residency programs. The article explains residencies as programs involving a year of student teaching under an experienced mentor, continuing mentorship after that year, and payment during the year in exchange for a three- to four-year teaching commitment.

  "...teachers trained through residencies are more likely to stay in the profession, potentially reducing churn in schools and costs of finding and training new teachers."  - Matt Barnum, Chalkbeat

"...teachers trained through residencies are more likely to stay in the profession, potentially reducing churn in schools and costs of finding and training new teachers." - Matt Barnum, Chalkbeat

Supporters of residency programs point to research saying that participants are more likely to stay in the position and a study estimating that they’re “modestly beneficial” for students. Detractors say residencies are potentially very expensive, there’s insufficient evidence of their usefulness, and that a study shows residency-trained teachers are less effective in their first years in the classroom (though they improve quickly).

At Elevate Teachers, we’re always encouraged to see people exploring new ideas for preparing and supporting teachers. We’re interested to see how these residency programs work in the future.

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

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